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Forum Home > Beliefs and other Oddities. > Cradley Heath Notes.

Alaska.
Site Owner
Posts: 1404

There are some who have the patience to keep a fairly up to date Diary, and there are some, like me, who just scribble on an old envelope, and then forget where we put it. Back in time, and in Cradley Heath, there was man who kept the notes, but failed to mention his name. One thing that can be said though, he may have been a regular around many Public Houses situated in the area. He records, that Mrs Tate, wife of the landlord of the Pub in Furlong Lane, on the 31st July,1880, fell down the well. He also notes, that she may have intended to do this, by adding the words in brackets, or jumped. Whether or not he was in the Pub when this next event happened, he doesn't say, for on 22nd August, 1893, Alice Baker, from Brierley Hill, committed suicide by taking poison in The Bird in Hand, Four Ways. His drinking it seemed, wasn't confined to just Cradley Heath, for on 17th October,1893, he records the death of a Maltster, ( Home brewed Beer and Ales ) William Oliver, in Colley Gate. The poor man apparently took a shotgun and blew his head off. He faithfully records, that on 21st March,1896, John Foley, licencee of The Three Furnaces, in Waterfall Lane, Old Hill, suffered an unfortunate accident while waiting for a train at Handsworth Station. Drunk or sober, he fell off the platform, just as the engine was passing. He next notes the loss at The Five Ways Hotel, of a popular licencee, Samuel Hobberley, who left on the 17th July 1896. He must have been mortified on the 15th October that same year, when Henry ( Harry ) Tibbetts left The Swan Inn, Lomey Town. He had a few other distractions to keep him busy, until his next entry concerning Public Houses, for in 1898, Neahamia Homer's Oil Shop at five ways burnt down, and in 1899, The Hope Tavern was blown up by a gas leak. The Tram had arrived in the Town when Joseph ( Joe ) Harris, described by the mystery writer as a 'scrap merchant ' , gave up the licence for The Royal Oak, Lomey Town on 8th October,1901. Lets hope he wasn't in the Railway Inn, on the 5th April. 1902, when the place was raided by the Police. Illegal Betting was the cause of this raid, and Thomas Scrivens, Licencee, was fined £100, James Tromans, £100, and Thomas Insull, £25. The Magistrates on the 18th April were not best pleased with this, and obviously marked Mr Scrivens card. They possibly all had a good laugh, when the body of Mrs Brettell, on the way from Quarry Bank to be buried, had to be recovered from the River Stour, after the hearse overturned in April,1902. Thomas Scrivens wasn't laughing two months later though, for he lost the Licence for the Pub on 17th July,1902. On the 27 August, our scribe noted that James, ( happy Jim ) Rowland, had vacated the Anchor, and moved to the Vine and Railway.  He kept the notes going for on 22nd February 1905, he reported tha Steven Deeley had left The Five Ways, and had taken a tenancy in Dudley. His last note concerning the area's Pubs, reported that after six years as mine host, James Rowland had left the Vine and Railway. And for the sports fans reading this, on the 27th December,1915, the " Grandstand " was blown down during a football match between Cradley Heath and Oldbury. Several spectators were injured, and a local man, James Homer, was killed. For those with an interest in the name, he was 47 years old.

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A wonderful thing is work, I could watch it all day.  ( See my Blog entry )

July 6, 2013 at 3:38 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Unicorn
Member
Posts: 46

The mystery man seems to have liked pubs and death a lot,has anyone any idea who he might be?

July 7, 2013 at 4:37 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Alaska.
Site Owner
Posts: 1404

From another Diary, but about 60 years earlier, we have the mention of a bit of financial trouble in the Gun Barrel Trade. Down at Hayseech, which by the way, although it now comes under Dudley, was, and still is, part of Rowley Regis, being in Cradley Heath. Not in Halesowen, as some would claim, that's on the other side of the River Stour. The Mill, was not the only place in Cradley Heath that produced Gun Barrels. One Thomas Barnsley, on the banks of the Mouseweet Brook at Newtown, had been in business for many years, and was listed as going strong in 1846. His brother, John Barnsley, was a short distance away in Reddall Hill Road, producing Chains, and they would go on to found a successful business in lifting gear, which is still around today, although now in Brierley Hill. Another Gun Barrel mill, owned by William Homer, is also listed in Cradley Heath at the same time, but there is nothing to say just where. If anyone's knows. drop me a line. In fact, the only Gun Barrel Mill in Halesowen was run by Alfred Rose, from premises at the bottom of Mucklow Hill. The mill pond, race and sluice were still marked on the map of 1904, the stream eventually ending up joining the River Stour near the bottom of Furnace Hill. Ironic really, Halesowen water powering the Hayseech Mill, which eventually put the Halesowen Mill out of business.

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A wonderful thing is work, I could watch it all day.  ( See my Blog entry )

August 23, 2013 at 3:25 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Alaska.
Site Owner
Posts: 1404

Now I was asked, a few weeks ago, to see what I could come with on a native of Cradley heath, one George Yardley. Back in the 1870s, George was a chainmaker, but a few years later, and he must have made a bit of money at it, for he was listed as a Chain Manufacturer, and Iron Dealer, having premises in Fox Oak Street, Cradley Heath, in 1881. He seems to have an eye open for investments as well, although it didn't seem to include a fancy house, for he lived quite frugally at 68, Cradley Road, Cradley Heath. There was a little boom on at the time, involving Cycles and Tri-cycles, and so George Yardley chanced his arm, and went into business as a Cycle maker. Undaunted it seems, that he knew next to nothing about making cycles, he bought into a firm in Stewart Street, Wolverhampton, which operated from the old Talbot Works. Things did not go well, and George Yardley had cause to regret the decision he had so rashly made. There's a saying in the Black Country, " stick to what you know ", and the pity was, he didn't. Dispite his protestations, he was declared Bankrupt in 1883, and the firms of George Yardley and Company, and The English Cycle Company, both disappeared from the records for all time. He went back to hammering out a living making chains, but the increase in mechanization, which required capital investment, were now beyond his means. It was a tough old world out there in the late 1800s, as many others would find out in due course.

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A wonderful thing is work, I could watch it all day.  ( See my Blog entry )

April 8, 2014 at 3:32 PM Flag Quote & Reply

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