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Forum Home > Carriages of Convenience. > Stourbridge Lion and the Agenoria

Alaska.
Site Owner
Posts: 1404

Following several requests, I have now included a page on the subject, and a couple of what I think, may be interesting pictures. It may help, if you compare the picture of the "Agenoria ", in the Images Album, to the ones on the new page. Just click on Steam engines above.

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A wonderful thing is work, I could watch it all day.  ( See my Blog entry )

August 21, 2011 at 4:20 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Alaska.
Site Owner
Posts: 1404

There were in fact, two Railway trials in 1829, the one at Rainhill, and one at the lesser known venue of Shutt End, midway between Dudley and Kingswinford. This featured the engine ordered by Lord Dudley, to haul coal, from his collieries to his wharfes, on the Staffordshire and Worcestershire Canal. The engine was the famous " Agenoria ", a sister machine to the " Stourbridge Lion ", which is the subject of the Steam Engines page above. The line, an incline plane, from the Pit to Flotheridge Basin, was a little over 3 miles in length, and passed a short distance north of Kingswinford. The wharfe itself, with rails on both sides, could handle 60 narrowboats at any one time, each carrying about 30 tons of coal. A degree of reliability was therefore demanded by Lord Dudley, hence the need for the trial. On the 2nd June, 1829, a large crowd gathered to watch the event, the first time many of them had ever seen a steam engine in action. Agenoria, with attached tender, weighed in at over 11 tons, to which were coupled 4 " carraiges ", loaded with 3 and a half tons of coal each. She pulled this lot easily, and they added 8 more carriages, carrying over 360 passengers. This bought the overall weight up to 42 tons, and with Lord Dudley excitedly waving from the tender, she set off for the wharfe. The trip took half an hour, at the majestic speed of 7 miles an hour. The cheering from the passengers could heard long before the engine hove into view. At the other end, a further 12 carriages and another 540 passengers were added, making the weight now almost 131 tons. Agenoria completed this run, partly against the incline, at an average speed of 6 miles an hour, at one stage, attaining the heart stopping speed of 11 miles an hour. Needless to say, Lord Dudley, although a bit sooty, was highly delighted, and the crowd went home marvelling at the new age. On high days and holidays, the local population were given rides on the Shutt End, as it came to be called, the engine working the line for the next 30 years. Foster and Rastrick was disolved in 1831, John Urpeth Rastrick, concentrating his energies on his other works at Black Lake, West Bromwich. The old engine lives on though, as one of the star exhibits at the Railway Museum, York, as does part of the old Bradley and Company Ironworks, Stourbridge, courtesy of an enlightened Dudley Council.


There was another, and less reported trial run, of a Foster and Rastrick Locomotive some months before this. The Bolton and Leigh Railway, had purchased a similar Engine to Agenoria, and under trial, the Company Engineer reported that it had performed well, and above the expectations, achieving a speed, fully loaded, of a breath taking 8 mph. They called their Locomotive, " The Lancashire Witch ". To most folk, in 1829, it would indeed appear to be a bit of magic, or the work of Satan, take your pick.

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A wonderful thing is work, I could watch it all day.  ( See my Blog entry )

April 14, 2012 at 2:06 PM Flag Quote & Reply

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