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Alaska.
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Posts: 1404

Information on this subject, and times, being what they are, can be found on many Genealogy site's, sadly it all has to be paid for. If you have an interest in the subject, fine, but if it's only your grandad you want to know about, it can be expensive. The records are kept at Kew, in London, and a word of warning, records for WW1 are not complete, many having been distroyed in the last War. There are two sections, the burnt ones, which have bits missing, and the unburnt, which may or may not be be complete. Some only list the awards made to each man, so if grandads name was John Smith, you may end up disappointed. Some will just say " Machine Gun Corps " or " Garrison Artillery ", which is not very helpful if you want to know where he served. Regimental Museums hold some records and War Diaries, so it is always worth a quick look online, but before making an enquiry, again, please remember, there is sometimes a charge. If your relative was an Officer, the chances are much better of finding out what he was up to. I would at this stage, recommend that you take a look, online, at a site called the Long Long Trail, which is full of useful information for the searcher. If your relative sadly failed to return home, a search of the Commonwealth War Graves Commision site should prove most enlightening. It list's the dead from both Wars, the grave site, ( complete with cemetery picture ) and the date and place of death where known. In some case's, it may list the Parents, Wife, or address as well. This one is Free, just follow the site's search instructions. Details of relatives from the last War, are restricted, and you will need to prove a link. A visit to Kew is required, although you can hire a researcher to find out for you. The charges start from around £10 an hour, so shop around first, and look for a good recommendation. There are a few volunteers around as well, who will help out should all this prove too much to handle. Just ask nicely, and be patient, it all takes time. if you want some honest advice, click the Contact Me button.  A bit farther back in time, and there are some Boer War records as well, although most deaths in this one, stemmed more from sickness, than action. I trust this bit of info covers the questions asked Mrs D, anything else you wish know just drop me another line, and I will do my best.


:)

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A wonderful thing is work, I could watch it all day.  ( See my Blog entry )

June 29, 2011 at 4:05 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Unicorn
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Posts: 46

It is nice to find a site giving you usefull free information.

June 30, 2011 at 9:43 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Alaska.
Site Owner
Posts: 1404

As a further aid, to help you on your way, I have put on a couple of first class websites in my Black Country Muse Links Page. If I can be of any help at all, just drop me a line, good luck.

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A wonderful thing is work, I could watch it all day.  ( See my Blog entry )

November 27, 2011 at 11:16 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Alaska.
Site Owner
Posts: 1404

Now here's a little tip you may find useful. If the male relative you are searching for, can't be found in the records, either in a Census, or a death index, and is aged between 19 and 35, you may want to search the Army records at the National Archives. Dates of interest would be between 1852 to 1863, then 1870 to 1886, and finally, 1889 to 1902. These should cover the period of the most intense use of the Countries Armed Forces abroard. There are some Battle causualties online, you will need to search for these and also search the listing, as they have not been digitalised. In response to why I have stopped, at 1902, the answer is, that there are plenty of records for the Great War, 1914 - 1918, and also for World War 11. There are some missing for the former however, due to a fire following bombing in the latter, and also some Naval Records were destroyed during an air raid on Portsmouth. This is a pity as some went back to the 18th Century and the age of Sail. We all have some relatives who died in The Great War, and I wanted to highlight the many sacrifices that were made prior to this, not just in Europe, but in the far flung reaches of the British Empire. Any Member wishing to add a relative from the period, just Click the Contact Me Button.

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A wonderful thing is work, I could watch it all day.  ( See my Blog entry )

July 28, 2012 at 4:39 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Alaska.
Site Owner
Posts: 1404

Now iv'e said before, that if the only thing you have found is a Medal Card, then thats likely to be what you will have to settle for. Until every Regiment has put online it's War Diaries, information will be hard to come by. Beware though, most only mention by name, Officer Casualties, or other ranks who earned gallantry Medals. Another area that causes confusion, is that some soldiers have more than one listed Army Number. This is mainly due to transfers, or in a great many cases, transfer to The Labour Corps. First of all, this was not a punishment. Every Regiment in the British Army, had at least one Pioneer, or Engineer Battalion. These units, before the War, tended to be made up largely of reserve Territorial Units, and comprised some of the older men. They all volunteered to serve abroad, and found themselves in the front line where they did sterling service. ( Mons for instance ) With the start of conscription, and younger trained men to hand, the High Command decided, in 1917, ( Official records at Kew ) to transfer all the older survivors to specialised units, all under the one name, Labour Corps. These units, dug trenches, laid barbed wire and cables, made roads, laid railways, and the hundreds of other tasks required by a fighting Army. All under shell and Machine gun fire. Also draughted in, were thousands of Chinese and Indian labourers, who worked the docks and transported goods around the battlefield. There were some rather elite squads among the Labour Corps, one of which was the teams of ex-miners, who dug tunnels, ready for the planting of massive explosive mines under enemy trenches. Only a few names, of those who took part in these dangerous jobs, have ever been found, and records appear to be almost non-exsistant. During 1918, in the last big push by the Germans, every man in the Labour Corps, no matter how old they were, stopped whatever they were doing, and picked up their rifles. They were all needed to stem the flow which broke through the lines, and threatened to end the war at a stroke. Theres a saying in the Army, no matter what you specialise in, when push comes to shove, you are all Infantry. It's as true today as it was almost a hundred years ago.


There are very few records of the men who served in the Labour Corps, not many of them ever got a Medal for it, but there were some. The number of Medals were small, about 1,600, and they were given to those whose war did not end in 1918. Battle fields are messy places after fighting stops, and someone has to clean it up. Step forward the men of the Labour Corps, who, not only cleared away all the broken vehicles, carts,guns, barbed wire, and other debris, but also dug up, from scattered graves, the bodies of fallen men. My grandfather, did not come home from the war, until it was almost 1920. Yes, he did have a medal from the Labour Corps, although where it is at present, I don't know. And they were not listed on the Medal Rolls either, as neither were the medals given to ex-TA men, who, time expired, willingly joined the Labour Corps. Talking of awards, here is something that some so called experts very rarely get right. S.W.B, on a medal roll, means Silver War Badge, which was awarded to men wounded in battle. They are all numbered and listed, and would be worn by men recuperating, or signed off, as unfit for further war service. Wouldn't do, would it, to have a wounded hero given a white feather by mistake. They could not of course, after the war, be worn with other medals, ( A great many medals were sold during the 1920/30s ) which enabled the real veterans to recognise the "  fake war heroes ". Cast your minds back a few years, and one such faker was exposed in a veterans parade, on Armistice Day. Take care who you ask for help, trust the experts who run the various Regimental Museums, it may cost you a few bob, but the information will at least be accurate.

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A wonderful thing is work, I could watch it all day.  ( See my Blog entry )

August 24, 2012 at 4:26 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Alaska.
Site Owner
Posts: 1404

Several requests have come in about the Boer War, which began in 1899, in South Africa. Now around 300 men, from the Dudley Area served in this most difficult of Wars, and a great many more, from the Blackcountry as a whole. Most of them were in the regular Army Regiments, but some voluteered from the many Militia and Yeomanry units based in our towns. The most famous of these, as far as local history is concerned, were the Queen's Own Worcestershire Hussars, ( designated as A Squadron ) who were based at the old Saracens Head Hotel, in Stone Street. The horses were stabled in Trinity Road. When it became apparent, that they would not immediately be called upon, the Earl of Dudley, raised, from this, and other mounted units, a second squadron, which was given the name " The Worcestershire Imperial Yeomanry ", and which then set off for South Africa. There was also another volunteer force which saw action, that was the 1st Volunteer Brigade, Worcestershire Regiment, ( designated G and M Companies ) one based at the Drill Hall, Wolverhampton Street, and the other possibly at the old Drill Hall, Grammer School Lane, Halesowen. ( Both of these companies being infantry )  Now its known, that at least 56 men, who gave their home town or district as Dudley, died during the three years of conflict. 19 of them were known to have been killed in action, 37 died of wounds infections, and sickness, the biggest killer being Enteric Fever. ( One of my relatives amongst them, never having fired a shot in anger ) As a start in looking for one of your relatives, I would recommend a visit to Queens Cross Cemetery, in Dudley, where on a magnificent monument to the fallen, are listed all 56 names. It was unveiled by the Commanding Officer of the Yeomanry during the campaign, Lieutenant-General Lyttleton, a familiar name to many in the region. You can't miss the monument, it stands 20 feet high and is topped with a rifleman, standing guard over a wounded buglar, and was design by a man from Old Hill, Mr H, Owen Burgess. More help can be had from The Museum of Staffordshire Yeomanry, or from the Worcestershire Regimental Museum. Once again, I should add, that Officers are much better recorded than the rank and file, unless they were involved in an action associated with a bravery award. Remember as well, that almost two thirds of the deaths were down to the dreaded Enteric Fever, and records of burials may be scarce. There is a book on the subject of the " The Yeoman Cavalry of Worcestershire, 1794 - 1913, and which includes the  Queens Own Worcestershire Hussars. You may have to do some searching to locate a copy, a good start would be your local library.

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A wonderful thing is work, I could watch it all day.  ( See my Blog entry )

December 6, 2012 at 11:53 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Alaska.
Site Owner
Posts: 1404

There are of course, a great many troops who never got a medal at all, or were simply entitled to just the Victory Medal. ( Many Soldiers never claimed it ) This is for the reason that these men never left the country, and never entered a war zone. Mostly older men, they did the thousand and one jobs neccesary to sustain the fighting troops abroard. Some, like the famous " Beven Boys ", worked down mines, in factories, on the docks, or replaced troops on Garrison duties in Ireland. A small percentage were lined up and shot. Now let me stress, that not all those executed, were sufferring from " shell shock ".  Represented in the records, are murderers, rapists, thieves, as well as deserters.  Although there was a general pardon issued some years ago, it did not mean that the gruesome crimes they committed were stricken from the records. Some of those executed at dawn, fully deserved the punishment they got, for thats what they would have faced in peacetime as well. There is, after all, no chivalry in War, it's a dirty, nasty business, whether Soldier or Civilian, and there's always a price to pay.

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A wonderful thing is work, I could watch it all day.  ( See my Blog entry )

March 27, 2013 at 11:38 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Alaska.
Site Owner
Posts: 1404

The Medal Roll Index, for those searchers who may have just started, doesn't list the full name of the men who were awarded Medals. There are many on there which contain names that are identical, after all, they came from all over the United Kingdom, and some actually arrived from the Commonwealth Countries as well. Just because you find the name of your relative, don't assume it is actually your relative. If you have been lucky enough to find the correct service or pension records, then the Army numbers will match. Beware of jumping to the conclusion, that the Medal Card, which you find is your relative, simply because the Regiment listed is local to where he lived. This may have some bearing from the early part of the war, but not later on, when all recruits were trained at a central camp, and posted to whichever regiment at the time required more men. Thus, you may get your uncle Fred, who came from say Wolverhampton, serving with a Scottish or Welsh Regiment. Better to begin a good search of your family archives, and see if there is any paperwork, or a picture of him in uniform first. It's a lot easier of course, if the man died in the War, for then he will be listed on one of the many memorials dedicated to the fallen soldiers. Guess work is all very well, but is it fair, having compiled a half decent family tree, only to knowingly pass on to others, incorrect information. Best to just leave it out, for it will also confuse others who are searching as well, and next year, there will be more than usual.

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A wonderful thing is work, I could watch it all day.  ( See my Blog entry )

June 21, 2013 at 11:55 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Alaska.
Site Owner
Posts: 1404

Many thousands of Telegrams were sent out during World War 1, announcing that the Soldier was missing in action. Most were followed up by the dreaded letter that clarified the situation, and ammended the message to KIA. ( Killed in Action ). Some though. were not so forthcoming, because the Soldier, although missing, was subsequently found to be a Prisoner of War.  Now there are very few records of these men, almost 175,000 Rank and File, and almost 8,000 Officers. The National Archives holds some, which have been made searchable, and can be found not only at Kew, but on some Genealogy sites as well. There is a section in the book, The Long Long Trail, that may be of immense use to those whose search has so far proved to be unfruitful. Other missing men, those with no known graves, are likely to remain missing for ever, although from time to time, the remains of small groups do get unearthed. The last major find was of some Australian Troops, who, thankfully, have mostly been identified through their DNA profiles. Mind you, if your long lost famlies Uncle Fred was blwn up by a shell, or other large explosion, there wouldn't have been enough left to bury. We arn't just talking about British soldiers either, there were men at the front, from all over the Empire, not forgeting the French and their Allies, nor the Germans and theirs, nor indeed the vast numbers of Russian Troops that were killed on the Eastern Front. Men went missing in other places as well, East Africa, Egypt and Palestine, Italy and the Balkans, and a large number at Sea. Never forget, that this was truly a global war, not confined to just France and Flanders, and one in which every Soldier, Sailor, and Airman, deserves to be remembered for the sacrifice, no matter which side they were on.

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A wonderful thing is work, I could watch it all day.  ( See my Blog entry )

August 11, 2013 at 11:12 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Alaska.
Site Owner
Posts: 1404

Following on from the mention of soldiers being shot at dawn, you may like to read the record of one such man, and then make up your own mind whether he deserved it. George Everill was born in Hanley, Stoke-on Trent, in 1887. He was by trade an Ironworker, and up to 1905, he had served a short time in the Territorial unit that comprised part of the North Staffordshire Regiment. He re-enlisted on 28th March, 1914, with the clouds of conflict forming over Europe. There was a need to train men, and so, due to the former service, he was given the rank of acting Sergeant, on the 12th September,1914. Interestingly, when he was posted to France in 1915, it was as Private Everill.  He was already showing signs then of a rebellious nature. In early 1916, he went  AWOL, ( absent without leave ) and sentenced to a years imprisonment. There was of course a shortage of men, and this was reduced to just 3 months in March, and he rejoined his unit. Just 8 days later, on the 16th March, 1916,and he was facing a charge of insubordination and dis-obeying an order. This earned him another sentence of 1 years imprisonment, and this time, the sentence was suspended. He must have felt, because men were needed, that no matter what he did, he would perfectly safe. On the 24th April, the  same year, he did it again, and, the patience of the armies courts exhusted, he was sentenced to 10 years Penal Servitude. This may have been what Everill had planned to happen, for the Army had no detention camps in France that could cope with this, and he was possibly expecting to be sent back to England. The Army had other ideas, and this sentence was again reduced, this time to two years, to be served in a camp near Calais. He began the term on 26 April, and was released, and sent back to his unit on 16th June,1917. Had he learned a lesson, no he hadn't, for on 13th July, after he had unleashed a torrent of abuse and insults at his Battalion Officers, he was sentenced by a military court to another 3 years penal servitude. As every man was needed at the front, this was recinded to 30 days, and loss of pay. On the 26th August, 1917, his Battalion was ordered forward into the trenches to relieve a hard pressed unit who had been under heavy artillery fire. When they moved forward, George Everill went backwards, and he was found over 6 hours later, hiding in a village, well away from the front line, and any action. Now it's hard to say that the man had not had every chance to redeem himself, for on at least two of the previous charges, he could have been sentenced to death, perhaps he now thought himself immune to any such punishment. He wa sadly mistaken, for found guilty of Desertion in September,1917, he was taken from his place of confinemnet at 6.00am on the morning of 14th September, and summerary shot. His Medal Roll contains details of the only award his widow, Lilian received, at her home in Southampton Street, Hanley, the 1915 star. It also has written on it, the chilling words, " Shot for Desertion ".


There are very few Service records in the online archives for most of the men who suffered this fate. Many had never been under fire, so the term " Shell Shock ", wouldn't really be appropiate. There is a need to understand also, the effect that such behaviour had on the morale of the soldiers of the Company, or Battalion, these executed men served in. Whether or not the punishment was an effective measure, is a mute point, for the French executed far more than we did.

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A wonderful thing is work, I could watch it all day.  ( See my Blog entry )

August 29, 2013 at 4:14 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Alaska.
Site Owner
Posts: 1404

There is, if you get stuck searching for a Soldier relative, the National Roll of Honour. Sadly, not all the dead are recorded on it. This may be for a variety of reasons, ranging from having very little family to report the missing name, to not actually taking part at all. We come again then, to the old family stories, passed down through the generations as true. I have one in my own, that of an uncle, who died, after the war, from the effects of Gas. It turns out that he didn't arrive in France until late 1918, and never got to the actually front line. ( Never, as it turns out, having fired a shot in anger )  The truth is rather more mundane, as his entire family suffered from similar effects, all down to their father, and the uncle, working at the Chemical Works in Langley, Oldbury, Worcestershire, before and after the war. Not included of course are those who were shot for desertion and other offences, nor indeed, those whose conduct on the battlefield was held in contempt. It's understandable, that men under fire will crack, and do some crazy things. There are several cases, where soldiers simply got out of the trench, put their hands in the air, only to be killed by a sniper, or burst of machine-gun fire. They all knew, that if they ran away they would be shot as deserters, so they committed a swift suicide. Others shot themselves, or ran screaming, single handed at the enemy. Non of this went done well with the rest of the men, and produced a black mark against their death. It's as well to treat family stories with a bit of caution, as the shame of the way they died, proved to be to much for most of the surviving relatives. Some Regimental War Diaries are now going online, and many can now be viewed at Kew. They don't cover individual names, unless some heroic action had been performed, but they will give you some idea of the circumstances of a relatives death. It is possible to get your missing relative added to the Roll of Honour, although I have registered my objections to anyone shot for desertion or Cowadice being included. Sorry if that upsets some, but you simply can't re-write history just to please a tiny minority. The Great War for Civilisation was a hugely political affair, and, it seems, still is.

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A wonderful thing is work, I could watch it all day.  ( See my Blog entry )

January 14, 2014 at 11:30 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Alaska.
Site Owner
Posts: 1404

A little reminder about something in one of the posts above, The Medal Roll. This is held in the National Archives at Kew, in London. It's available to search on a few genealogy websites, and lists which, if any, Medals were awarded to each man who served. It can also contain useful information as to whether he was wounded, and sometimes. will list his rank if he was promoted. Sadly, many soldiers after the War, and with very little work for them do, sold off their medals, which means that they are no longer in the family. You can't get them replaced, but you can buy replicas of the three most often seen, the 1914/15 Star, the British War Medal, and the Victory Medal. A few more pounds will also get them engraved with name, rank, Regiment, and his number. (The originals were all stamped) All of which you will find by searching the Medal Rolls. As well as these medal, 115,600 men were awarded a gallantry medal called the Military Medal, and were allowed to use the two initials after their name, MM. Some men were awarded this medal more than once, a bar being added to the original, altogether totaling 5,977 men, one of whom had three bars added to his. That leaves 109, 623 men with the single MM, and to find out if your relative is amongst them, you will need to search the archives of the London Gazette, where their names, and award, were printed, together with the unit they were serving in. If you are really lucky, you may also find the citation, which details the action they received the award for. Now a little word of caution here, for some who served, bravely it has to said, may have distorted the truth of what they did in the War, so check the Medal Roll and the other records before you committ yourself to print. It's not uncommon to find a man, borrowing the name of a fallen comrade who had a gallantry award, knowing he wouldn't be found out easily, especially if he served in a Regiment that had no direct link back to the West Midlands. War Committees, set up in each district, were in the habit of honouring local men who performed heroic acts, by issuing an illuminated scroll. They didn't check the facts before issue, and a few were left with rather red faces when it all turned out to be untrue. Why you may ask, would a brave man need to do this, and the answer is, to gain a bit of an advantage, and bolster his own ego, after he himself had never been in the firing line. All a bit tragic really.

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A wonderful thing is work, I could watch it all day.  ( See my Blog entry )

February 8, 2014 at 2:31 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Alaska.
Site Owner
Posts: 1404

Due to some crippling losses in 1916, the Government was forced to introduce conscription as the number of volunteers fell away dramatically. Along with the " call up " papers, came the right to appeal against war service, for not everyone called, was fit or able enough to fight. Several men from the region, already missing an arm, leg, or eye due to industrial accidents, were granted exemption from service, but many more, unwilling to serve, made up a few excuses to avoid military service. Towards the end of 1916, in Halesowen, Worcestershire, a Tribunal had over 50 cases to deal with. The mental health of the townsmen must have been very poor at the time, for several men, who had claimed to be " Mentally Defective ", and had returned the forms to the War Office, were ordered to appear in person to state their case. Around 80% of the claiments were ordered to report for duty as instructed. The cases had been appealed by the Military, and this didn't go down well, as most thought they had got away with not serving King and Country. The same problem continued, and in February,1917, the Tribunal was again forced to sit as a similar number of men had their claims objected to by the Army. Joseph Parsons, and it doesn't state if he was one of those claiming an exemption, strongly expressed his objections about the Military appeals. Not surprising really, as again, most of the Army appeals were upheld, and the claiments went off to War. Nowadays, most folk would say, good luck to those who got away with it, but viewed at the time, when others and their families, had already made sacrifices, it was a shameful thing to be doing. Non of those from Halesowen and district, were actually named in the reports, but I suspect a few received the dreaded " White Feather " . The Tribunals were held in every town in the Country, it's just that the ones in Halesowen were reported more often, and give a far better picture of what some of the population thought about the war.

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A wonderful thing is work, I could watch it all day.  ( See my Blog entry )

July 26, 2014 at 4:11 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Alaska.
Site Owner
Posts: 1404

Most of those reading this, will apreciate, that the British Army had certain standards when it came to recruitment. Being resonable fit was an obvious one, having good eyesight was another, and of course, having the correct number of limbs when signing up for service. But what about a mans height. The minimun standard was 5 foot 3 inches, ( 160 cm ) and anyone below this, was initially rejected. This caused a bit of a row in late 1914, for in the mining and industrialized areas, many otherwise fit and able men were turned away. Manchester paved the way for these men, by forming two Battalions of undersized men, later to become part of the Cheshire Regiment. The new regulations for these units, accepted men with a minimum height of 4 foot 10 inches, ( 147 cm ) but they had to be otherwise fit and heathly. They quickly earned a nickname, being refered to as " Bantams ". Naturally, the idea spread, for the Army was ever in need of volunteers. In Newport, South Wales, in March,1915, the 12th Battalion of the South Wales Borderers was formed, this being another one of the Bantam units. Together with the 19th Battalion, Royal Welch Fusiliers, and other similar units, they comprised, in 1917, 119 Brigade, part of the 40th Division, and they were about to make a bit of history.


The reason I have included this item, is because amongst the ranks of the ' shorter soldier ' was a man from Greets Green, West Bromwich. His name was Emanual Pace, and in 1917, he was 20 years old, and by trade, a Blacksmith, an ideal candidate for the Battalion, for although small, he was powerfully built. His Battalion, 119 Brigade, and the 40th Division, were about to get an experience that few would forget, and even fewer would survive: The Battle of Cambrai, November,1917. This was the first time, that both Aircraft, and Tanks, had combined with Infantry in a major attack. Bourlon Wood was a ridge of high ground, and on 23 November, with the Battle underway, the 19th Royal Welch were ordered to take the western half of the woods, and the 12th S W Borderers, the eastern half. The 19th were in control of their objective by about 11.30am, but the 12th had encountered very heavy resistance, and the Tanks hadn't made much difference. This was down to two factors: The Tank Commanders had'nt seen the woods before, and the infantry had never been trained to work with Tanks. The fighting was fierce, bloody, and hand to hand, the losses began to mount. Just as the 12th gained the edge of the wood, they were hit with a counter attack, which slowly drove them back. After some heavy shelling, they were again counter attacked at 3 pm, and only the courage and bravery of several Machine gun crews prevented a complete collapse. During this action, Pte Emanual Pace, earned himself a mention in dispatches, and a recommendation for the Military Medal. On the 25th November, the 40th Division was relieved from the area, having sustained over 4,000 casualities in two days of bitter fighting. The 12th Battalion had been almost wiped out. It wasn't until the12th March,1918, ( publication 13th March )  that Pte E Pace's recommendation, and confirmation of the MM, was published in a supplement to the London Gazette. Now it's no wonder, that many who fought and survived the War, rerely spoke about it. The sights and horrors of Bourlon Wood, must have given Emanual Pace endless nightmares over the years. His Military Medal now resides in the Regimental Museum, just a small testament, to the courage of a giant of a man, even though he was under 5 foot 3 inches.


Notes.

During the same Battle of Cambrai, but two days earlier, Corp. Joel Jones, who worked for Kendrick and Jefferson, West Bromwich, rescued a fellow soldier while under heavy fire. He served with the Royal Irish Regiment, was awarded a Military Medal, which was presented to him in the town hall on 18th September,1918. Over 120 men from West Bromwich won awards for bravery during the war, among them, Sergeant Major Postans, ( DCM ) Pte J. E, Smith, (MM) Pte Pickett (MM), and Capt. R.E, Phillips, (VC )  who were all present at the award ceremony.

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A wonderful thing is work, I could watch it all day.  ( See my Blog entry )

September 22, 2014 at 3:42 PM Flag Quote & Reply

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