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Forum Home > Memorabilia From the past. > Blackcountry Heritage.

Alaska.
Site Owner
Posts: 1404

While I was preparing items for inclusion, I noticed that we seem to be short of a few things. The lack of old buildings for one, and, unlike some of the neighbouring places, the absence of Statues. Wolverhampton has one, Prince Albert, Walsall has Sister Dora, and I know there are a few other things that commemorate specific trades. Stourbridge and Willenhall have rather  ornate Clocks, Darlaston's got a Bull Stake, and Dudley's has the Black Country Living Museum, and, a neglected Fountain called " The Spout ".  I won't mention the Castle at this point, as Dudley doesn't own it. What else have we got, that I've missed. There are some fine examples of the sculpters art in some of our Churchyards and Cemeteries, although like the War Memorials, in honour of our nations dead, are at constant risk of vandalisation.



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A wonderful thing is work, I could watch it all day.  ( See my Blog entry )

March 27, 2011 at 11:33 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Unicorn
Member
Posts: 46

There is an old clock just outside West Bromwich.

March 27, 2011 at 1:39 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Alaska.
Site Owner
Posts: 1404

So there is Unicorn, and a few more scattered about the region. Walsall's got one, and so have many other places. The lack of old Building's though, is a sad reflection of the times. Having said that, trust Dudley Council to go and do something right for once. They applied to the Heritage Lottery Fund, for money to renovate the old Baylies Hall, in the High Street. The Hall was built in 1824, is listed Grade II, and now owned by Aston Auctioneers. The site itself has been in use since about 1732, when there was a School built. The original Baylies Charity School is commorated by two sculptures, which will be repaired and put back when the scheme is completed. It's a lovely Building, and thanks to some foresight by the Council, it will be there for many more years to be enjoyed by future generations. Well done Dudley.

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A wonderful thing is work, I could watch it all day.  ( See my Blog entry )

May 3, 2011 at 2:16 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Alaska.
Site Owner
Posts: 1404

In this weeks Black Country Bugle, there is an article highlighting exactly what I meant. Last week, there was a serious fire on the site of the old Stuart Glassworks, in Wordsley. Thankfully the site is empty, and the preserved Glass Cone, is on the other side of the canal. The old glassworks building though, have been, once again, damaged by the mindless vandals who seem to infest the Black Country. They may only be bricks and morter, but they played a major part in the area's history, and are some of the few heritage markers we still have left. They should be saved for future generations, and yes, I do realise it will cost a great deal of money, but once they are gone, they can't be replaced/

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A wonderful thing is work, I could watch it all day.  ( See my Blog entry )

May 20, 2011 at 11:52 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Shutter Bug
Member
Posts: 2

Can I first correct the above, the Baylies Hall is in Tower St, Dudley. Yes, it was great to see the old Baylies building have a make-over, I'm just waiting for the two statues in the alcoves on the outside of the building to have there jackets painted blue, as they were originally.

Dudley Fountain. The Earl of Dudley presented the fountain to the town in 1867, which replaced the old Town Hall in the market place Dudley. The Fountain was designed by James Forsyth who also Sculptured the Perseus Fountain at Witley Court, the fountain was made of Portland stone at a height of 27 feet. It was exhibited at the Paris Exhibition of 1867. The fountain could do with a good clean to get rid of the pigeon mess, because some bright spark is using it as a pigeon feeding table.

I've heard that the old building of the former Stuart Crystal Works in Wordsley may be refurbished and used for a Glass Museum.

May 11, 2012 at 5:34 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Alaska.
Site Owner
Posts: 1404

And I was pleased to hear Shutter Bug, that Dudley Council recently turned down an application to cover the roof of a building in Brierley Hill with some rather ugly Solar Panels, thus detracting from the lovely old brickwork, all of which were locally made. Last week I also learned, that the Zoo and Castle had teamed up with Dudley Museum and Art Gallery, and the Canal Preservation people to access funding for improving the visitor experience. The Zoo and Castle now have many more visitors, and the turnover has reached 3 million pounds a year. It was a great idea to combine all three attractions. All thats needed now, is a spare few millions to open up the Wrens Nest Caverns, rather than fill them with sand, to preserve whats left. I may not still live in the area, but I do try to keep up with developements. Sorry for the slip up with the wrong street, I was working on something else at the time. Old age creeping up I suspect.

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A wonderful thing is work, I could watch it all day.  ( See my Blog entry )

May 11, 2012 at 10:09 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Alaska.
Site Owner
Posts: 1404

I wouldn't want anyone to think, that because the website is dedicated to the past, no account is taken of modern needs, Not every building is actually worth saving, nor should the site's of demolished structures remain unused. Some of us may not like the modern materials selected, or indeed the style chosen, but an up-to-date care home, or much needed housing, is far better than preserving an old factory or cowshed. Small, and older individual building, preserved within the framework of the new, have a role to play, and add to the educational side of all our lives. A great many folk bemoan the loss of old Public House's, why?. They were not built for their architectural value, but for a companies commercial conciderations. It should be applauded that so many have been converted to living space, or a change of business use to benefit the local community. This is what is planned for a place I used to frequent, The Swan Inn, Long Lane, Halesowen, although it will have to be demolished for the new building. In the past, a great many old factories and outmoded workshops were demolished to make way for several estates in Wolverhampton, Willenhall, and Bilston. The same has happened elsewhere, and will continue, such is the way of progress. No good harbouring grudges against a local Authority, they have far more to get on with than pampering to the likes of some, who would prefer it all preserved, and never stop moaning that it wasn't. I bet, the people who now live in rather better accomodation than their ancesters did, wouldn't agree with them. We should all take note of what some groups have achieved over the years, Saint Johns Church at Kates Hill, Dudley, the local Canal Trust, the various Preservation Societies, non of whom stood by and watched, but lined themselves up and raised the funds in a grand Do-it-yourself action. Our heritage isn't all contained in old bricks and morter either, it includes memories of past lives and sacrifices as well. It's up to us all to be the preservers of the past, while being the providers of the future, not an easy task at the best of times.

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A wonderful thing is work, I could watch it all day.  ( See my Blog entry )

May 23, 2013 at 11:53 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Alaska.
Site Owner
Posts: 1404

English Heritage have just announced a scheme where everyone interested in the subject, can now take an active role. Following a trial run, where 350 volunteers helped to survey proprties on the at risk register, the scheme is to be extended. ( Go to their website for more details ) Having a building listed, doesn't guarantee that it will be safe, take for instance the listed ruins of the New Hawne Colliery, Halesowen. Listed on 8th October,1975 as Grade II, it's in a state of disolution. Originally it comprised the old Winding House, the Fan House with Chimney, Offices, Workshops, and Stores. Today, only the Winding House survives, and given the critea for listing now, it's unlikey to be on a future register, given the coming review. To be fair, it's not Dudley Councils fault, as not a single group has come forward with any plan of action as what to do with it. While the newly listed Nailers Cottage, in Hasbury, has at least some hope of restoration and futher use, this building hasn't. The only folk who seem to visit it regulary, are the mindless hooligans of the town. It wasn't of course, the only Coal mine in the area, and the reason for the original listing seems to have been the Arched windows and the red bricks. I can see why any local authority would have given it a very low priority, but I can't understand the total lack of local interest over the last 38 Years. And for some who asked, no, there wasn't a murder at the colliery site of a night watchman. Just another example of someone not checking a story before writing about it.The murder happened at another mine, in nearby Old Hill, called the Black Waggon Colliery, the story of which can be found in my Black Country unsolved murder section. What happens in the future, to the old Winding House, is very much up to the efforts of the locals or an interested group. I wouldn't hang around too long discussing it either, for time waits for no man, and this pile of bricks surely hasn't got a lot of time left on the meter.

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A wonderful thing is work, I could watch it all day.  ( See my Blog entry )

October 11, 2013 at 2:46 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Alaska.
Site Owner
Posts: 1404

If there's one subject thats guarenteed to bring folk out of the woodwork, it's the imminent closure of a Public House." Why ? "  Thousands have shut down over the years, it's a natural progression, the inhabitants chop and change their habits to match the times. They were all opened as commercial enterprises, to sell beer and spirits, not as social centres. Other than for the pursuit of liquid profit, they have no other function, and if they can be re-used to house people, or put to more useful community benefit, ( yes, even shops ) so much the better. A great many I frequented, in years gone by, have now disappeared, leaving nothing but a vague memory of throwing up in the gutter after a night on the booze. It would be true to say as well. that many who bemoan the loss, never once actually set foot in the place. A fact that was bought to mind, from last year, when out of yet another moan about a Pub, I was the only one who could describe the interior. Like any business, if there are no customers, it will shut down. ( Thats the rule of supply and demand )  The question is, is this part of our Heritage? The British were once described as a nation of Shopkeepers, better that than a nation of drunkards. Like it says, on the cans and bottles of booze you buy cheaply in almost any shop today, don't use after the " Best Before " date. On a personel level, I have never supported any petition to save a public house from closure, nor will I ever, for the sell by date has long expired.

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A wonderful thing is work, I could watch it all day.  ( See my Blog entry )

May 12, 2014 at 10:12 AM Flag Quote & Reply

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